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Washington is one of the worst states for retirees, report says

A rainy day in Seattle on Oct. 21, 2017. (KOMO Photo)

Let's say you're about to retire, claim your Social Security, sign up for Medicare and take a well-deserved rest from the daily grind.

Now you need to decide where to live as you enjoy your retirement years. Should you stay in Washington state or seek a new home somewhere else?

According to a recent study, you should get out of the Evergreen State - fast.

Washington is the eighth worst state for retirees - for a lot of reasons, says the newly released report by Bankrate.com.

First, there's the cost of living, considered the 12th highest in the nation. Then there's the crime rate - also much higher than the national average.

And the weather? Well, it might be lovely in mid-summer ... but how about the cold, soggy, moss-encrusted months between mid-October and mid-April? So, the study gave low marks for our weather, too.

Health care quality is also below the national average in Washington, the report found. And the state's cultural attractions - about average.

The state's best attributes, according to the study, are its tax rate - largely because Washington has no income tax - and residents' sense of well-being. But even those were hardly better than the national average.

All of which brought the state's score down, down, down.

The only states worse than Washington for retirees are Illinois, California, Arkansas, Louisiana, Maryland, New Mexico and New York (which came in last), the study found.

And the best state for retirees? It's South Dakota, according to the Bankrate.com study.

Residents of the Mount Rushmore State scored the highest on the well-being score and they live in the second most tax-friendly state in the country, according to the Tax Foundation, which offers relief for seniors living on a fixed income. The state also scored well on health care value and measured well on cultural vitality.

Rounding out the top five states for retirement are Utah, Idaho, New Hampshire and Florida, the study found.

And what about Hawaii? It came in No. 10 - with the third-highest cost of living in the nation.

The study's complete rankings for all states can be found here ....

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