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Concerned residents seek answers at West Point Treatment Plant

Concerned residents gathered at the West Point Treatment Plant Saturday morning looking for answers. KOMO Photo.

SEATTLE - Concerned residents gathered at the West Point Treatment Plant Saturday morning looking for answers.

The plant, in Seattle's Magnolia neighborhood, dumped 180,000,000 gallons of waste water in the Puget Sound in early February after heavy overnight rains.

The wastewater treatment plant is one of the region's largest. It is still operating at limited capacity, King County officials say.

Residents at the plant Sunday said they were curious to learn more about what happened.

"I was curious to learn what happened," Alex Dunne, a local resident, said. "It sounds like they're still trying to figure that out but they do know where at least the two main sources of failure were."

Officials at the plant told residents that one of the sources of failure was in an electrical feed into the system that may have been compromised by the heavy rains.

The other source of failure were float switches that went bad.

Many residents said they still can't believe the catastrophic flooding that happened at the plant or that it led to millions of gallons of storm water sewage gushing into the Puget Sound.

Directors say they haven't gotten any reports yet of wildlife being impacted and say they are regularly monitoring the area.

Others aren't too sure about that.

"As a sailor and a kayaker, I'm going hiking," Jonathan Frodge, a local resident, said. "Whether its safe or not ... that still remains to be seen."

The county says it is working hard to meet every deadline to have the plant up and running by April 30.

King County Council says it will conduct an independent review.

Residents at the plant Saturday said they are concerned about something similar happened again.

King County officials say to check their website for the more recent updates.





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